Immigration

Green Card – Permanent Residency

Source: USCIS.gov

Many people get Green Cards (become permanent residents) through family members. You may be eligible to get a Green Card as:

  • an immediate relative of a U.S. citizen, this includes spouses, unmarried children under the age of 21, and parents of U.S. citizen petitioners 21 or older
  • a family member of a U.S. citizen fitting into a preference category, this includes unmarried sons or daughters over the age of 21, married children of any age, and brothers and sisters of U.S. citizen petitioners 21 or older
    a family member of a green card holder, this includes spouses and unmarried children of the sponsoring green card holder
  • a member of a special category, this can include battered spouse or child (VAWA), a K nonimmigrant, a person born to a foreign diplomat in the United States, a V nonimmigrant or a widow(er) of a U.S. Citizen

Information on fiance(e) visas or adoption is located in other sections of USCIS.

Green Card Through a Job

The main ways to immigrate based on a job offer or employment are listed below:

  • Green Card Through a Job Offer: You may be eligible to become a permanent resident based on an offer of permanent employment in the United States. Most categories require an employer to get a labor certification and then file a Form I-140, Immigrant Petition for Alien Worker, for you.
  • Green Card Through Investment: Green cards may be available to investors/entrepreneurs who are making an investment in an enterprise that creates new U.S. jobs.
  • Green Card Through Self Petition: Some immigrant categories allow you to file for yourself (“self-petition”). This option is available for either “Aliens of Extraordinary Ability” or certain individuals granted a National Interest Waiver.
  • Green Card Through Special Categories of Jobs: There are a number of specialized jobs that may allow you to get a green card based on a past or current job, such as:
  1. Afghan/Iraqi Translator
  2. Broadcaster
  3. International Organization Employee
  4. Iraqi Who Assisted the U.S. Government
  5. NATO-6 Nonimmigrant
  6. Panama Canal Employee
  7. Physician National Interest Waiver
  8. Religious Worker

All of these require a Form I-360, Petition for Amerasian, Widow(er), or Special Immigrant, and are described in Section 101(a)(27) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (INA).

In some cases, you may be able to file the immigrant petition (either a Form I-140 or I-360, depending on your category) at the same time that you file Form I-485, known as “concurrent filing.” For more information, see the “Concurrent Filing” page.

If you are not eligible to adjust your status inside the United States to a permanent resident, the immigrant petition will be sent to the U.S. consulate abroad to complete the visa process. In order to apply for a green card, there must be a visa immediately available to you.

 

Disclaimers

Freedom Rings gives you general information on basic court processes, but will not give legal advice as they are not lawyers.

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